Hadassah President Scores Double Standard of Justice at Un, Rising U.S. Conservatism

A double standard of justice at the United Nations and a rising tide of conservatism in the United States were assailed today by Mrs. Max Schenk, national president of Hadassah, the women’s Zionist Organization of America, at the opening plenary session of the organization’s 55th annual convention here. In her address to 2,000 delegates. Mrs. Schenk deplored the low priority accorded by the U.S. Government to anti-poverty programs, education and foreign and domestic aid to medical research and warned that “delaying tactics” by Government officials heralded “a frightening return to segregation in the South.”

Mrs. Schenk took the UN Security Council to task for having “failed miserably” to preserve peace in the Middle East. “It has been resoundingly silent in its condemnation of member nations who have violated all canons of law and decency.” she said. She noted that Israel’s position in the world body was such that it made it difficult for Israel “to obtain any semblance of justice.”

Mrs. Schenk recalled that last June, Hadassah undertook a far-reaching experimental program to help combat hunger and poverty in the U.S. She noted that several thousand Hadassah women are now working in school lunch and school tutorial programs in 30 cities. She said that Judaism will not be deterred from its quest for the “good society” which rests in “clearly defined” ideals and objectives.

Mrs. Schenk cited Hadassah’s activities which are helping to “relieve human needs.” They included: a growing medical complex including Hadassah’s rebuilt hospital, rehabilitation center, and school of occupational therapy on Mount Scopus, in Jerusalem, and new institutions of oncology and neurology; rehabilitation and rescue of Jewish youth from oppression; and education and training of young men and women through the organization’s Israel education services. The largest Zionist organization in the world, Hadassah spends more than $12 million dollars annually on its undertakings.

President Richard M. Nixon, in a message to convention delegates, commended the organization’s “dedication in advancing opportunities for the young and in improving the health and education of men and women of all ages.” He praised Hadassah for its “wide range of interests and activities” which, he said, “exemplify the kind of human concern and civic involvement which are so vitally needed in our world.”

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