Menu JTA Search

U.S. -ussr Exchange Ideas on Resolution for UN Action on War

The United States and the Soviet Union have discussed “ideas” on a possible resolution for United Nations Security Council action on the Mideast conflict but no specific presentation has been formulated, the State Department disclosed today.

Department spokesman Robert J. McCloskey sidestepping a question by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency whether the Soviet Union had drafted a specific proposal for the Security Council replied: “In our discussions (between the U.S. and USSR) ideas have been exchanged on a possible resolution. These are a little more general in nature than citing specific resolutions. Yes, we have talked about that kind of matter.”

PROPOSALS BUT NO CONSENSUS

McCloskey said earlier that it would be correct to say there were specific proposals but no consensus. He said America’s “preferred course” for Security Council action was stated by John Scali, U.S. Ambassador to the UN on Oct. 8. The U.S. is open to views of others, McCloskey added, and some views have been presented in bi-lateral conversations. But, he said, “No one could tell you at this time the form of a resolution that may develop.”

The Department spokesman, pressed on reports that France, Italy, Spain and Britain have denied facilities for U.S. planes flying military supplies to Israel, said it would not be correct to speak of a denial but would not otherwise comment. He gave a “no comment” on the statement by Sen. Henry Jackson (D.Wash.) that American planes are landing in the Azores on the way to Israel.

McCloskey, replying to another question on whether NATO bases in Europe were ruled out as landing spots, declared he was not ruling “anything in or out.” He added, “We have established a means by aircraft and we won’t outline where that is. It is working and we are satisfied.”

NEXT STORY