Kissinger Calls on International Community to Combat Terrorism

Secretary of State Henry A. Kissinger called on the international community today to "vigorously" combat the "plagues" of aircraft hijacking, international terrorism and new techniques of warfare. He also urged the United Nations "once again" to adopt anti-terrorism proposals "as a matter of the highest priority." Kissinger was speaking on "international law, world order and human progress" before the American Bar Association at its annual convention in Montreal.

He told the lawyers that "the U.S. is committed to the principle that fundamental human rights require legal protection under all circumstances; that some kinds of individual sufferings are intolerable no matter what threat nations may face. The American people and government deeply believe in fundamental standards of humane conduct. We are committed to uphold and promote them. We will fight to vindicate them international forums."

The U.S. in 1972 proposed to the UN a convention for the prevention or punishment of certain acts of international terrorism, Last June, the U.S. offered a resolution to the ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization), recommending mandatory compliance with suggested regulations to ban unauthorized weapons in aircraft. This resolution, the State Department said, is being circulated among ICAO member governments. A proposal against "safe havens" for hijackers was offered to ICAO in 1973.

Kissinger, in his speech today, made no mention of the Arab boycott nor did he say anything about enforcing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights upon which the Jackson-Vanik legislation affecting Soviet emigration is based.

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