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  • Public menorahs light up U.S.

    Public lightings of Chanukah menorahs in the United States create a sense of Jewish pride for many. To others, the displays raise issues of church and state, as well as questions of religious significance.

  • High Holidays in war zones

    Jewish soldiers over the years have marked the High Holidays where they could — in Belgium, Korea, Vietnam and even Saddam Hussein’s palace.

  • A rummage sale on a fast day?

    Depending on sect, Jews mark the saddest day on the religion’s calendar with anything from fasting and mourning to new member brunches and rummage sales.

  • Seder reinvented for bored kids

    Parents and educators have begun to institute activities, commentaries, games and other inventions in order to regain the attention of bored children and indifferent teenagers.

  • Sukkot highlights need to enjoy everyday life

    Sukkot is not about observing the sublime moments. Rather, it’s about dealing with the toilsome, troublesome and tedious exigencies of everyday life.

  • Writing the Torah, a letter at a time

    A family joins others at the Milken Community High School to ink in a letter of a Torah scroll that was recovered from the Holocaust, remembering Shavuot, when the Torah first was given to the Jewish people.

  • Remembering immigrant Passovers past

    The storytelling we do at the seder can also revive thoughts of the stories more recent Jewish exiles tell about leaving the lands where they were born, and how they lived once they got to their new homes and had their own children.

  • Columbia president talks about the situation

    Although Purim is often thought of a holiday for children, it’s also a great time for older adults to have fun by sharing the holiday’s festive observances.

  • People and trees need each other

    On Tu B’Shevat, Jan. 25 this year, Jews celebrate the birthday of the trees; it’s a good time to think how human being and plants need each other.

  • Duct tape and all, sukkah is holy place

    ENCINO, Calif., Sept. 21 (JTA) — What is a sukkah? To Rabbi Akiva, the sukkah represents the actual huts that housed the Israelites during their 40-year trek through the wilderness. To Rabbi Eliezer, the sukkah symbolizes the Clouds of Glory, encompassing God’s presence, that accompanied and protected the Israelites. To my four sons, who are…