simchat torah

  • Lower the bar: words of distraction for aspiring Jewish lawyers

    Taking the bar exam tomorrow? Looking for encouragement? Here are a few quick distractions to cool your nerves and reassure you about your career path decision. No guarantees, of course.  [[READMORE]] Stereotypes about Jews in the legal profession are a sensitive matter, as CBS learned in 1971:  "’All in the Family,’ which premiered in January,… More ▸

  • In Moscow, Reveling on Simchat Torah

    It’s a few minutes to midnight in the Marina Roscha synagogue and the vodka is flowing. Strains of Hebrew dirges fill the cafeteria where hundreds of people line tables that stretch across the hall. Suddenly a black-garbed figure bounds onto the head table, singing fervently, clapping his hands and testing the table’s breaking point with… More ▸

  • In Moscow, reveling in Simchat Torah

    Across Moscow, Russian Jews poured into synagogues to celebrate the pinnacle of the October holidays with the dancing and singing cacophony of Simchat Torah, a holiday that resonated even during the decades of Soviet oppression. More ▸

  • In Moscow, reveling in Simchat Torah

    Across Moscow, Russian Jews poured into synagogues to celebrate the pinnacle of the October holidays with the dancing and singing cacophony of Simchat Torah, a holiday that resonated even during the decades of Soviet oppression. More ▸

  • A Holiday Popular in Soviet Times, Simchat Torah Still Draws a Crowd

    During Soviet times, when the Communist regime persecuted people for practicing religion, Simchat Torah was the most popular holiday among Moscow Jews. Thousands of Jews would come to Moscow’s Choral Synagogue to dance, sing and have a shot or two of vodka under the open sky. Former underground Jewish activist Rabbi Zinovy Kogan called the… More ▸

  • Sukkot, Simchat Torah and the cycle of life

    NEWTON, Mass., Oct. 16 (JTA) – As we move out of the High Holiday season, we move into another series of holidays that is at once both cyclical and linear. At the beginning of the New Jewish Year we celebrate Sukkot, thereby completing the third in a series of pilgrimage festivals. Sukkot marks the final… More ▸

  • Simchat Torah Feature: Make Torah Study a Regular Family Habit

    Experts say it takes 21 days to make a habit. Do something — run, write in a journal, make a to-do list — repeatedly and consistently every day for three weeks and that action will become yours. We are what we repeatedly do, Aristotle taught us. Speak of Torah to your children in your home… More ▸