Yiddish

  • Arts & Culture Dorothy, Shmorothy: Kansas U. Gets Enthusiastic Yiddish Scholar

    As bullets whistled overhead and the smoke of the Battle of Black Jack wafted through the warm air 150 years ago this month, a terse conversation passed between two men fighting alongside abolitionist John Brown. “Nu, was meinen Sie jetzt?” (So, what do you think of this now?) August Bondi, who later recorded the conversation… More ▸

  • Highlights of Jewish News: 5765 September 2004

    CHICAGO — MRIs are more effective at detecting breast cancer caused by gene mutations occurring in some 2 percent of Ashkenazi women than are mammographies, according to a new study. The study involving the mutation to the BRCA genes, which have been linked to breast and ovarian cancers in Ashkenazi Jewish women, is published in… More ▸

  • Playing Softball in the Mame-loshn: Heritage Lives Again at Yiddish Week

    The sun is peeking over the hills and a silvery mist is rising off the lake. Dishes clatter in the dining hall and a shorts-clad group is setting off for a walk in the woods. It’s a typical morning at a typical mountain resort — with one difference. Here at the Berkshire Hills Emanuel Adult… More ▸

  • News Brief

    A Yiddish theater in New York City received a $1.5 million grant from the city. The money given to the Folksbiene Yiddish Theater will help it find a permanent home, the New York Jewish Week reported. The theater is in its 90th consecutive season. More ▸

  • Arts & Culture Milken Archive’s Treasure Trove — U.s Jewish Music Released in France

    Leonard Bernstein is one of America’s most renowned and beloved composers. His name immediately brings to mind the music he composed for the theater, such as “West Side Story,” “On the Town,” “Candide,” “Wonderful Town.” His “Kaddish” is also famous. But how many people know Bernstein composed an abundance of sacred and secular Jewish music,… More ▸

  • News Brief

    An exhibit of illustrations created for children’s books written by I.B. Singer will soon go on display. The exhibit of illustrations by Irene Lieblich at the National Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Mass., is part of celebrations of the 100th anniversary of the birth of the Nobel Prize-winning author. More ▸

  • Across the Former Soviet Union Stalin Has Long Been Dead, but His Jewish Region Lives on

    The odd story of Stalin’s Russian homeland for the Jews has taken another strange twist. The ribbon-cutting ceremony at the two-story Moorish-style synagogue in Birobidzhan last Friday was the highlight of a weeklong celebration of the 70th anniversary of the Jewish Autonomous Region, an area in Russia’s Far East that Stalin declared a secular Jewish… More ▸