Seinfeld

  • Watch: A version of ‘Seinfeld’ that’s really about nothing

    If you thought the legendary sitcom “Seinfeld” was really a show about nothing, spend six minutes watching this viral clip. Video editor LJ Frezza stripped some shots — mostly of New York City building exteriors, but also some bleak bathrooms and work spaces –of characters and dialogue, leaving just the music and laugh tracks. What’s… More ▸

  • 10 shows that would have had awesome Thanksgivukkah episodes

    Thanksgivukkah isn’t happening for another couple of weeks, but already it has bestowed upon us many gifts, including a great recipe for roasted Brussels sprouts with pastrami and pickled red onion, a rapping turkey, and a “Colbert Report” bit so funny the host himself lost it. There’s something else on our wish list for this… More ▸

  • 10 TV Jewish couples we love

    There aren’t that many Jewish couples out there. On television, that is.
    Sure, there are plenty of mixed marriages, as there are in real life, but the small screen doesn’t usually feature a couple where both members are Jews.
    But we were able to come up with 10 of our favorites in honor of Valentine’s Day after racking our pop culture-loving brains (and searching the internet).
    Here they are:
    1. The “retired and moved to Boca” couple – Helen and Mordy Seinfeld (“Seinfeld”)

    They love each other but fight all time. They wonder why you never call them (or Uncle Leo) and invite themselves over. Mordy (Barney Martin) always complains and yells about everything he doesn’t like, and Helen (Liz Sharidan) yells back at him but always has his back. The Seinfelds are the thick-skinned, proud and caring couple who somehow get along in a faraway land called Florida. More ▸

  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus’s Israeli TV mistake

    Julia Louis-Dreyfus, best known for her role as Elaine in “Seinfeld” and as vice president in HBO’s “Veep”, is making Israeli headlines after starring in Israel’s YES satellite television company commercial. In the commercial, Louis-Dreyfus assumes a woman in her elevator is pregnant, and spends the rest of the commercial coming up with solutions of how… More ▸

  • What’s the deal with the “Modern Seinfeld” Twitter account?

    What if the most popular sitcom of all time, “Seinfeld,” took place in 2012? It’s hard to believe it’s been more than 14 years since the “show about nothing” went off the air, and while we still enjoy the nightly syndication episodes, two people figured out how a modern-day “Seinfeld” would look like with a new, popular… More ▸

  • Nine Types of Jewish Dads on TV

    This week we salute you, the Jewish father.
    Why? Well first of all, because this Sunday is Father’s Day, and secondly because we usually pay more attention to Jewish moms, that we often forget how great Jewish dads are.
    They are so great, that unlike most Jewish mothers who are very similar in their television portrayal, the TV Jewish fathers are so different from one another, so we decided to name nine of our favorite types of Jewish dads on TV.
    1. The Workaholic Dad – Ari Gold (“Entourage”)
     
    He’s married to his work and the actors he represents are his actual children. We know it, Ari Gold knows it and his family knows it. The world’s most notorious movie agent (Jeremy Piven) has the ability to make television explode from over-bleeping. Ari is a devoted Jew… when it doesn’t conflict with his work (he escaped Yom Kippur services to try and seal Vincent a lead role in the movie “Medellin”) and is also an over-protective father. In fact, he is so over-protective that when his daughter Sarah begins to like child actor Max Ballard, Ari sends him to Kazakhstan to shoot a new movie to keep him away from his daughter. More ▸

  • 10 TV Jewish Mothers We Love (or Hate)

     

    A Mother’s Day special! Because if you’ll put all of them in a blender and add some guilt, you’ll get your mom! And you love your mom, don’t you? Well it wouldn’t hurt you to say it more often.
    1. Sylvia Fine (“The Nanny”)

    In a show that turned an eccentric Flushing-Jewish stereotype into an art form, Sylvia Fine, portrayed by Renée Taylor, was the queen. Constantly visiting the princess, Fran, and the Queen-mother, Yetta, Sylvia Fine (née Rosenberg) was a New York Jewish mother in a nutshell – overbearing, loud, hungry and mostly dominant.  Oh, and loud too.

      More ▸